Journal of Laboratory Physicians
Home About us Ahead of print Current issue Back issues Subscribe Instructions Contact Login 
Wide layoutNarrow layoutPrint this page  Email this page Bookmark this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size 
 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 426-431

Prevalence, etiology, and antibiotic resistance profiles of bacterial bloodstream infections in a tertiary care hospital in Northern India: A 4-year study


1 Department of Laboratory Medicine, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
2 Division of Trauma Surgery and Critical Care, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
3 Department of Orthopaedics, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Purva Mathur
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 110 029
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JLP.JLP_78_18

Rights and Permissions

INTRODUCTION: Bloodstream infections (BSIs) can lead to life-threatening sepsis and are globally associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although BSIs require immediate antimicrobial treatment, their prevalence, etiology, and antimicrobial susceptibilities differ from one country to other. There is a dearth of such data from India. Here, we report the 4-year etiologic data on BSI in trauma patients admitted to a tertiary care referral hospital in New Delhi, India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted at the trauma center between January 2013 and December 2016. The routine microbiological data on bacterial BSI were recorded and determined retrospectively from the laboratory records. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 2017 bacterial strains isolated from blood culture samples were included for microbiological analysis. During the study, the median age of the patients varied from 30 to 35 years, with the percentage of females in the study population varying from 17% to 19%. The predominant pathogens were Gram-negative bacteria, with Acinetobacter species, followed by Klebsiella species being the most commonly isolated organisms throughout the 4 years of study. Among Gram-positive isolates, Staphylococcus species were the leading pathogens (11%–15%). CONCLUSIONS: A detailed analysis of prevalence, etiology of BSIs in India and its resistance profile is crucial for appropriate antibiotic use, clinical management, and formulation of antibiotic policies and preventive measures.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed136    
    Printed8    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded24    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal